Tag Archives: India

Very Very Kolaveri!

There are currently two kinds of Indians. Those who have heard ‘Kolaveri’ and those who haven’t. Which category do you belong to?

I had face-un-booked myself last week but when I couldn’t abstain any more, I jumped right back into my account, and came across a link shared by a couple of blogger friends (Deeps and Vampire Brat, for instance). The title was ‘kolaveri’ and I opened it with very low expectations, as I am not that big a fan of Dhanush. But guess what? We have been listening to this very colloquial, crazy, silly song (in loop!!) for the last three days, with even my 5-year old singing it! I definitely did not see that coming!

First, click here to view the song on Youtube.

Second, tell me what you thought of it?

A small section of audience have expressed undisguised disgust at the song – for its poor lyrics, colloquial language, etc. and simply don’t understand what the hype is about!

Okay, I’m not ashamed to say I loved ‘Kolaveri’! It is perhaps even one of the worst songs ever, but it certainly is the most played song on my phone! It gets dangerous at times, though. Like yesterday, I was on the phone with my son’s school teacher, and there was this line ‘Cow-u cow-u … holy cow-u’ blasting away in the background. Ahem.. I might need to look for a new school soon. But, I digress (actually I don’t, but I like using that term ;-)). (Okay okay, I stole that line from Pixie’s post BUT to be fair, I did take her permission, mind it ;-))

Courtesy: Wiki

But hey!! What makes a song/film a hit? I saw a Hindi film called ‘Dhobi Ghat’ the other day, and loved it. It was serious, sensible and left an impression (not to mention stellar performances by Aamir Khan, Monica Dogra and cute Prateik Babbar). Now Ra One, in comparison made absolutely no sense whatsoever! However, as you might have rightly guessed, while Dhobi Ghat was a below-average-box-office-hit, Ra One despite not being critically acclaimed, was supposedly a ‘hit’ in India and a ‘superhit’ overseas (so sayeth the great Wiki!)

So what makes something like ‘Kolaveri’ a global rage? The video has apparently grossed 3 million views on Youtube, and more than 8 million shares on FB!

Well, to me, it is very simply, what I can connect with!

Kolaveri is a song that EVEN I can sing! Take any aspect of it.. words/tune/lyrics.. it is all so colloquial that even a layman can understand every nuance of the song and totally identify with it. To give a background, this is supposedly a light-hearted song sung by a young boy who has been jilted in love. Ah! What better reach to an audience than an average loser being dumped by a hot (and fair-skinned!) girl! The lyrics are very simple .. one need not break his/her head to understand the meaning of ‘white-skinu-girl, girl heartu-black.. eyes-u eyes-u meetu meetu, my future darku’! As for the tune, I loved it. The background score is fresh, and very cleverly infuses a trace of folk music into a trendy beat, making it a peppy number. Add to it an immensely talented bunch of young stars (Dhanush, Aishwarya Rajnikanth and Shruthi Hassan) that are evidently enjoying the foot-tapping number even during the recording, and one finds it hard to not like this song!!

(Sorry, Count Bratula, I had to choose that meanie picture of your Shruti ;-) Buhahahaha :mrgreen: :lol:)

More importantly, the world-wide success of this song (the latest video on FB is a group of Chinese dancers choreographing a dance to Kolaveri) has made me realise one thing. While perfection is great, being ‘real’ is far more attractive. Something that is technically perfect and outstanding, may not really be something I can relate to. For example, I simply do not enjoy authors who use ‘big words’. Blame it on my limited vocabulary, but I’d rather go for something simple, that I can enjoy.

Sushil Kumar wins KBC, courtesy: Rediff news

I suppose this is the reason why authors like Chetan Bhagat are so popular! (Allow me to hastily clarify that I am NOT a fan of his!!). I now understand why, Bhagat, despite being far from the best writer around, has certain mass appeal. At a tangent, another example would be the runaway hit programme Kaun Banega Crorepathi. The programme is not merely about ‘knowledge’ or ‘trivia’ but about the fact that an ORDINARY man or woman, like you or me, actually stands a chance at something so magnificent. It is also why chick-lit (I truly find the term demeaning) is extremely popular, despite scoring low on the literary count.

One could argue that art that is too colloquial actually lowers standards. That is true to a certain extent. But don’t our standards change as we evolve as a society itself? Modern art, chick-lit, colloquial songs like DK Bose and Kolaveri for example… these too, are a part of our culture now. While at one time, classical dance forms was what India was famous for, today Bollywood dance is a dance form by itself, and has many takers around the world!

These new, simplified forms of art, may or may not be the best. They may not be perfect. However, they are accessible to you and me.

The success of art, therefore is based on the ability of viewers to connect with it. So as times change, our standards change to an extent too.

As I see it, ‘perfection’ itself is over-rated. Anything less than perfect, is not so bad after all. On the other hand, it might even be more interesting!

Kolaveri, like many other things, is far from being perfect. And therein exactly, lies its appeal!

So, my dear soup-u – boys-u and girls-u, now-u you tell-u me, ‘why this kolaveri?’

(Cross-posted on www dot the-nri dot com)

Fair or not?

I started this post as a lazy Wordless Wednesday but simply couldn’t NOT write a couple of lines about it!

Do take a look at the picture below ….

Is this fair?

And we don’t spare even London!

 

What is with our Indian mindset that ‘fair’ people are automatically considered ‘good looking’? Why this obsession with fair skin?! I have never understood this!

I know of so many girls/boys who are praised for their ‘beauty’ ONLY because of their skin colour (I say that because they utterly lack other features!). Just the same, I know some people, who are truly beautiful, but are not considered so simply because they have dark skin!

Why is someone with a ‘milky-white’ or ‘wheatish’ complexion considered to be a better human being than someone who is dusky or dark (worse!!)?

Why is a fair-skinned person rated higher on the matrimonial scale than a dark-skinned person??!!!

Westerners go all our to get a ‘tan’ and we layer ourselves with skin-lightening creams!

On my last trip to Chennai, a nice elderly gentleman mentioned that he was trying to find a groom for his daughter. His exact words were ‘She is very fair and good-looking, like your relative xyz’. I was amazed at his simplicity, naivete and crudeness all rolled into one. I don’t blame him. That is simply, a part of our culture! We are ignorant enough to assume that someone who is fair is indeed more beautiful than someone who is dark!!

I wished him well. And also wished his daughter had more to her than just fair skin! Like perhaps some inconsequential things like confidence, education, capability, etc.

I met someone the other day, who said something at the opposite end of the spectrum, but that was, in essence the same! This acquaintance casually mentioned a distant cousin who was an extremely intelligent and wonderful person, but was unable to find a bride because he was ‘extremely dark’. Well, what can I say! Had this been the ’2000 pounds’ scene from ZNMD, I would have just laughed! But this is real.

We just seem to be obsessed with skin colour! Something makes us believe that being fair is an achievement in itself!! There is some underlying factor that makes us proud of our light (read: ‘superior’) skin-colour? I would really like to know what it is.

Is this ‘fair skin’ purely an Indian obsession? Or is this rampant world-wide?

Please, do share what you think!!

Five easy steps to get a headache

Five easy steps to get a headache   

Simply talk to an acquaintance that fits the description below:

1)      Is extremely talkative – talks like he/she is an express train, or like he/she is suffering from diarrhoea and is rushing to find a toilet! Someone who talks without waiting to hear a reply, or on hearing a reply, pounces on that, and asks more questions than what Kasab has been asked!

2)      Is very loud – His/her normal voice is like a loudspeaker, so loud that you can hide your phone under the sofa and still hear the person loud and clear.

3)      Forces you to baby-talk with his/her Toddler – With absolutely no warning, right in the middle of a conversation, the acquaintance puts her toddler on the phone to talk to you. So one second you are listening to the express train. The next, you are supposed to be enjoying the babble of a child you don’t know. Honestly, I’m sure that child is an absolutely adorable little angel, but WTH, you are not in the mood for baby-talk!

4)      Is looking for a job – Within 5 minutes of the phone-call, he/she has interrogated you and knows your entire bio-data and that of your spouse’s too. Needless to say, in the following 5 minutes, he/she has asked you for leads, for contacts and for your email Id and your spouse’s email ID too, to float her CV around. And all this, when you hardly know him/her.

5)      Is very very very eager to meet you. Even if you are evidently hard-pressed for time. The person is kind enough to invite himelf/herself to your place, if you don’t have the time to go out to meet him/her.

So there! If you don’t have that head-ache yet, do let me know. I can pass your telephone number on to this latest acquaintance of mine!

The fuss about going Green

Pic courtesy: http://www.metrolic.com/going-green-121170/

The fuss about ‘going green’

Honestly, I don’t understand what all this ‘go green’ fuss is about. There has been an explosion of TV shows, green marathons, walks, talks – you name it! But, how does it matter to me – if the earth runs out of oxygen or water after 1000 years? I won’t even be alive then!

It simply makes no difference to my life. Or does it?

Thar desert - pic courtesy: Wiki http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Thar_Desert.JPG

A long time ago, when I was still a pig-tailed-school-kid, we learnt about the soaring temperatures (40+ degrees centigrade) in the Thar desert in Rajasthan, and were utterly shocked. How anyone could survive in such hot conditions baffled us! Two decades down the line, today, almost every other city in India crosses this temperature with ease. That too, even before summer strikes the nation! Madhya Pradesh and Gujarat apparently topped 48 degrees in 2010. Hundreds died due to the heat wave. A hill station like Shimla touched 32 degrees C. Monsoons get delayed, people die of hunger and thirst. We could be one of them. It does make a difference.

Winters are getting colder and harsher. Where once snow was a Christmas-time pretty scene, it is now dreaded in many parts of the world. Incessant snow, coupled with rain that makes roads slippery and dangerous, are a bane.

We do not need to wait for 1000 years for the earth to perish. While that might not even happen, chances are that you and I could be stranded in that crazy, unprecedented snow today!

We don’t often realise, that we do not lead isolated lives. A toy manufactured in China from materials that simply cannot be recycled end up in the home of a child in India. Cucumbers imported from Spain may be the source of an E. coli outbreak that Germany claims, killed four people and affected 200 more. Relentless gas emissions from certain countries results in a global-level weather change, in simple terms global-warming!

You see, in this truly global village that we live in, our lives are interconnected!!

The more careless a person is about his/her local environment, the more disastrous it becomes for the earth as a whole.

The thing is, we often don’t realise what all this fuss is about.

Going green. What does it even mean?

Well, to put it very simply, ‘going green’ means doing little things, taking baby steps, to preserve and help the environment from perishing. A yahoo answer says: ‘To “go green” means to live a lifestyle that is more harmonious with one another and the earth. Energy efficiency, keeping things maintained, using cleaners that will not remain in the earth and poison wildlife, reducing trash, reusing and recycling.’  Quite a good definition, that.

Now we come to the difficult part. How do we GO green? What can a layman do, to help the environment? Sounds really tough, does it not? Here are some really simple steps that you and I can take – every day – to go green.

1)      Recycle – I cannot stress enough on this topic. Recycle. Recycle. Don’t just trash your non-perishable goods. Take a good plastic bottle for example. Instead of just throwing it into the bin, see if you could use it for something else. Or worst case, make a recycling bag. Trash all your glass, plastic and metal into it, so it gets to be recycled and made into something else. In UK, the government provides free recycling sacks to every household, and even insists on separate bins for perishable garbage and recyclable goods. Though, a couple of years back, there was a scandal about UK shipping a phenomenal amount of recyclable waste to ‘China’ and ‘India’ instead of actually recycling it. But that is another discussion, for another day. The point is, we simply must learn to recycle anything that is not perishable.

Pic courtesy: http://www.simonlluma.eu/wp-content/plastic_bag_3.jpg

2)      Say No to plastic – I know we have this soft-corner for anything plastic. Plastic bags, plastic storage containers, plastic toys.

All smiles!

Even plastic smiles ;-)

But please, try to say NO to plastic. Let us not clutter our homes and lives with plastic – simply because it cannot be recycled.

Once cheap plastic has been trashed, it simply adds to the rubbish dump and cannot be used to make anything else. It is not bio-degradable, takes between 45-1000 years to degrade at sea, and did you know (I certainly didn’t) – it takes oil to produce them and it takes more oil to recycle them than it does to produce.

Pic courtesy: http://www.urbanrail.net/as/delh/delhi.htm

3)      Shake that ass – Don’t get me wrong. I just mean, instead of driving your vehicle to cover the smallest distance, try to get moving. Walk, if time permits. Or ride a bike. Cycle all the way to work, if possible. Or use public transport. Buses, trains, car-pool. It is well worth a shot, at trying to reduce fuel consumption. Saves not just the environment, but your hard-earned money too.

4)      Save money – Reduce electricity bill – Who does not love TV? As long as one can avoid Ekta’s soaps, TV is an awesome pastime. In this weather, we need fans, lights, air-conditioners all the time. but let us analyse our lifestyle, and think, for a moment, if there is any way we can reduce our electricity consumption. For example, instead of running the drying cycle in your washing machine for an hour (thereby even damaging your machine!), can you just turn off the drier after say 15 minutes, and then hang the clothes out to dry in hot sun? Given our soaring temperatures, this should not be a challenge! Again, instead of sitting on that comfortable couch, watching TV all day, go out for a walk with friends instead. You not only cut down on electricity and fuel consumption, but also help yourself achieve a healthier lifestyle.

5)      Be blatantly Kanjoos (stingy) – My 4-year old simply does not understand ‘WHY’ we have to save water. To him, water flows freely in every tap, in every house. So, why bother?

You see, a lot of work goes on in making water potable for you and me. That apart, being water efficient leads naturally to a reduction in carbon, energy and utility costs. Pumping treating and distributing water from reservoirs, rivers and groundwater sources produces approximately 50kg of CO2 per household per year – and a further 250kg of CO2 is produced when you heat water at home. Did you know that: 25% of you energy bill goes on heating water to shower, bathe and clean? Being water efficient can half your hot water use, saving you 12% off your energy bill?

For those of you who are not yawning out of boredom yet, I stumbled upon this excellent website that lists out various ways to go green. (click the link). Do read it, and see what is applicable to you.

So, after reading what all the fuss is about, should you choose to ‘go green’, do drop in a line and let us know.

And if you don’t, then only remember, you do not need to wait 1000 years for the earth to perish. It is happening right here, right now. You and I cannot do anything drastic about it. But we sure can take baby steps towards help the environment we live in.

(P.S: That was not a threat. Seriously.)

(P.P.S: Who are we kidding? Go shake that ass, kanjoos!!)

** This article was originally written for Ek Titli. If you wish to contribute, kindly contact the Ek Title team via their website.

On English and snake-charmers

Three events in a row, have been rankling in my mind for some time now.

A birthday party earlier this year. The birthday-boy was English, and his grandma and I were making P.C (as my dear friend Sowmya refers to ‘polite conversation‘). She enquired about our plans to ‘settle down abroad’ and I replied that we intended to ‘head back home‘. When she said, ‘Well, good for your son that he is ‘here’ now, he can learn his language (English) here’. I laughed it off. Inwardly, I was SEETHING.

A chance encounter with a friendly Mum-Kid duo at a play-area. The mother was Indian, born and brought up in Africa, and now settled in the UK. In the course of our conversation, she happened to say – with evident surprise – ‘Your English is beautiful!‘ and wanted to know how I managed to speak English, coming from India.

Amsterdam

A little conversation on a canal boat in Amsterdam. The American couple seated in front of us, struck up a conversation, and happened to mention that they were surprised to hear my son’s ‘British/American accent’. Naturally, the question that followed was how he managed to converse with our relatives/friends back in India, and IF people in India could speak English.

Three incidents. They were friendly and innocent remarks, not meant to cause any harm or insult. However, the unspoken words set me thinking.

So, why is it that foreigners ASSUME that people in India do not understand/speak English?

It is not just foreigners. Even second generation British Indians (i.e. whose parents or grand-parents settled in UK and these folks were born and brought up here), seem to think the same way. I was asked by an ‘Indian’ colleague, if people in India could speak English, and if everybody was still very poor! I remember being quite shocked at the ignorance and stereotyped image she carried of her country!!

So, does India still project this image of being a third-world country, where people wear saris or dhotis, chew paan, speak only their regional language, and watch snake-charmers perform tricks by the side of the road?!

Pic courtesy: thedeafblog dot co dot uk

Does the word ‘India’ conjure up a picture of beggars and snake-charmers or monkeys performing tricks and people throwing coins onto a ragged cloth spread on the dusty road?

Does the western world not know how developed we are, on various grounds? We have miles to go, that is certain, but we aren’t exactly an undeveloped, tribal land today!!

Do they see us as Slumdog-non-millonaires? (On another note, I remember being angry at the producers of Slumdog Millionaire for projecting such a pathetic, stereotyped image of our country!)

Chennai city centre mall

Does ‘India’ not represent a modern and growing nation at all? What of all the IT parks and banks that have sprung up in the last couple of decades? And the dreaded call-centres that cater to western countries? What of the high-rise buildings and roads crowded with cars and bikes? I do understand that our villages are a far cry from cities. But they too, are developed in more ways than we can imagine!

Courtesy: Google images

If nothing else, what about our adorable Kalmadi, Radia, Raja and Kanimozhi :roll:? If nothing else, atleast these esteemed folks should give them a better idea of the state of affairs in our country :lol: :lol:

On an interesting note, I googled ‘India’ on Google Images, and this is what came up: Our flag, the Taj, maps, even a picture of Shahrukh Khan posing for Chak De :lol:

Sadly, there was no Anna, and heavens be blessed, no Ramdev  ;-)

Courtesy: Google images

Now coming back to the question of ‘understanding/speaking English’, from my limited experience, most Indians can understand the language, and can communicate fairly reasonably, if one can ignore the grammar/pronunciation. Even the simple vegetable vendor can understand a few words. So if a foreigner were to visit an Indian city (I am not sure about remote villages), he can manage to get across a few basic words. Just as he/she would, in, say, Russia or Germany! Don’t you think?

Courtesy: Asiaforum dot co dot uk

On a lighter note, we can “…talk English, walk English and even laugh English because English is a very phunny language.”

Well, to the friendly American tourist on that boat – I strongly recommended that she make a visit, cover the grand palaces in Rajasthan, and go all the way down South to marvel at the exquisite temples. She genuinely seemed quite interested. Just before we left the boat, this is what I said to her:

‘I do hope you visit India some day, its a beautiful country. Only, don’t expect to see any snake-charmers!!’

She replied, with a smile, ‘Damn!! I was hoping to see some!’

So people, how do non-Indians perceive India? Any ideas?

Friday Fun

Just saw this post on someone’s FB page:

Every Women is a Rani Lakshmi bai

Every Women is a Rani Lakshmi bai

Rani Before wedding

Lakshmi duing wedding

Bai after wedding

Hee hawwww :lol: :roll: :lol:

Happy Friday, folks! And happy long weekend (wherever applicable :-))

(PS: My apologies for not being regular at my blog or at yours!!! Will be back soon!!)

I know I’m old when…

I know I am old when…
1) While filling in any application (even a darn credit card), I have to scroll, and scroll, and scroll a couple of pages down, to reach my ‘Year’ of birth!!! I mean, seriously, it wasn’t that long since I was born, was it?

2) I watch the Idols of our teenage years (SRK or Juhi Chawla) on screen, and realise they have considerably aged!!! So if a young and vivacious’Ghoonghat Ki Aad Se’ Juhi is a comical-looking old woman now, that makes me.. er.. Ok, let’s skip!

3) My kid asks me, ‘Mummy, which is bigger? 4 or 33?’ I reply, with a smile, ’33′. He laughs happily. When I suddenly realise, the ’33′ he is referring to, is … me!!

4) An Alumni meet is planned, and we realise it has been TEN YEARS since we left college! How could T-E-N years have whooshed by??! :roll: I mean, I don’t know what happened in this decade!

5) For the first 5 years of my career (or say, all 5 years of my career), people who used to report to me were double my age! I used to feel sorry for them. I suddenly realise, in a few years, I will be one of them!!!
6) All the ‘kids’ in the apartment block that my parents live in, greet me with a cheery ‘Hi AUNTY!’. I have gotten quite used to that one. But the next lines are what shock me out of my wits. I ask them ‘How is college?’ and they guffaw and reply ‘Whaaat Aunty! I have been working for 4 years now!’

7) I meet my parents every 6 months or sometimes, more frequently than that. And every time I see them, they seem more ‘sober’ and ‘quieter’ (considering that we are a strange family, in the sense that none of us acts appropriate to our age!!!)

8) I log into Skype to chat with an old friend, and we realise, that it has been 9 years since we saw each other!!! I mean, NINE years is a long, long time.
9) I read this lovely post on ‘decision making’ and the start of a promising career!! I realise I have come a long, long way. I mean, not that I have a career, but it has been a couple of centuries since I was at that juncture of ‘opening my first bank account’ :-)

10) When you lovely readers read this post, and send me loving ‘Awwws..’ and kind ‘Hugs’, then I’ll feel like a total piece of crap. Aged crap!!

And on that cheerful note :lol:, I wish you all a very happy week ahead!! Live life to the fullest folks. You just don’t realise how Time flies. And very soon, you might be writing a post like this yourselves!!!!

What a wonderful life – Aruna Shanbaug

[Thank you, DNA India, for mentioning this blog post at this page here] and thank you, Mon, for pointing it out, else I wouldn’t have known!

 

Every time I read this:

‘He (Sohanlal Bhartha Walmiki) choked her with a dog chain and sodomized her. The asphyxiation cut off oxygen supply to her brain resulting in brain stem contusion injury and cervical cord injury apart from leaving her cortically blind

..I feel nauseous.

Rape is an indescribable violation of both BODY AND SPIRIT. Being so brutally attacked, and left to die, is living hell.

PLEASE, DO READ THIS VERY STRONG POST. The tears won’t stop. The poor woman was menstruating, so Brute-Rapist-Sohanlal committed anal rape, and left her bleeding to death.

PS: Our esteemed rapist’s name is hardly mentioned by media. So I am taking the liberty of calling him ‘Brute-Rapist-Sohanlal’. Earlier, I had typed ‘Rapist Sohanlal’ but that sounds quite filmy, almost entertainingly trivial even!

A lot has been said about the ‘Brute-Rapist-Sohanlal’ case.

Now why did I choose this title ‘What a wonderful life’ for this post.

This is why:-

(1) Our WONDERFUL Indian culture sweeps ‘rape’ under the carpet. You can steal, punch or even murder someone. But RAPE? Oh no! Now Rape is taboo. We can DO it all the time, but we just DO NOT TALK about it! Praise be to Indian culture!

‘Once Dr. Deshpande decided to conceal the fact of anal rape out of his twisted sense of preventing ‘social rejection’ for the victim and her fiance, there was no going back (Link: Ria’s blog)

The most bizarre part of the story is, however, the accused getting away with a seven-year sentence for robbing and attacking her. Why? Because no one was ready to be the complainant for the sexual assault. Her hymen was intact, so her rape was “unnatural”, which is severely punishable by the law.

But the hospital — already beleaguered following the attack — didn’t want to report an “unnatural offense”, which could lead to further unrest. (Link: blogher.com)

This is exactly why women do not often lodge a complaint about rape. If the rapist has raped her ONCE, our precious MEDIA involuntarily RAPES HER IMAGE MULTI-FOLD. She is left with ‘no face’ to show to society. She and her family are either pitied or scorned. Either way, they become a disgrace.. a black mark!

Indeed, media does help to fuel ANGER against the ‘incident’. But at what cost? The victim is left with no privacy and no respect, while the rapist remains anonymous!

THE ONLY WAY WE CAN CHANGE THIS CULTURE IS IF WE BEGIN TO FOCUS ON THE CULPRIT RATHER THAN THE VICTIM.

Every article that the Internet throws up talks about ‘Aruna being attacked by a subordinate‘. The rapist is a nameless entity. A man, without an identity, name or description. There are no pictures of Brute-Rapist-Sohanlal. There are only those of the victim.

Why are we, as a society protecting our rapists? Why don’t we expose them??!!!

There is only one way forward – Every time media flashes ‘Breaking News’ about a rape, they should bombard us with pictures and history of the RAPIST, not of the poor victim. Instead of interviewing the tear-stricken face of the victim and her shame-faced family, they should focus completely on the inhuman rapist and his family/friends!!

LET US SHAME THE CULPRIT, NOT THE VICTIM!!!

This, should not be ‘Aruna Shanbaug Case’. It should be ‘Sohanlal Brutal Rapist’ case!

(2) Our wonderful society very often seek to explain and justify WHY Sohanlal raped the victim.

Almost every link from the internet has featured this sentence:

The man was motivated by intense resentment at being pulled up for his misdemeanours and being ordered about by her.’

and this:

Walmiki was motivated partly by resentment for being ordered about and castigated by Shanbaug

No offence to any authors/websites please. I am MERELY WONDERING, if our SOCIETY SEEK TO JUSTIFY RAPE?

All the articles try to explain WHY Sohanlal raped the victim. It is almost a Cause and Effect scenario. So somewhere, in the darkest recesses of our mind, we are probably trying to ‘UNDERSTAND WHY HE RAPED’.

That, to me, is dangerous. There is NO REASON, NO EXCUSE for a man to rape someone!

(3) Our WONDERFUL judicial system convicted the rapist, of what had been legally proved. Robbery, and ATTEMPTED murder.
Take a look at the justice meted out:
(Link: timesofindia.indiatimes.com)
Honestly, what was that all about? Sohanlal was convicted of minor offences, and was awarded two sentences that ran PARALLELY?!
Today, he lives a free man! While Aruna serves a rigorous life sentence!
Wonderful! I have nothing to add.
(4) And lastly, to all our WONDERFUL self-righteous-humanitarians - Why are we jubilant about keeping the poor woman alive?
What are we celebrating? The spirit of life? The wonderful selfless service of the nurses who are keeping her alive? Or is this a tribute to a ‘survivor of rape’?!!
Wait a minute – In all this, WHERE IS ARUNA???
Read this excerpt from Blogher.com: The author has written to Pinki Virani (the journalist who brought Aruna’s story to light) and received the foll. response:-

this, she does. because it is her last memory — of being sodomised in her workplace, of being strangulated with a dog-chain while being raped.’

Please watch this quick interview with Pinki Virani:

http://www.ndtv.com/video/player/india-decides-9-pm/the-passive-active-euthanasia-debate/192952

She asks a simple question – ‘Would YOU be willing to spend even a moment in Aruna’s shoes?’

The Supreme Court has now legalised PASSIVE EUTHANASIA. So someone in Aruna’s place NEED NOT go through the hell she is still living. A patient’s blood-relations can move for passive euthanasia. That is a minor victory, no doubts. But is it enough, atleast for Aruna?

Life! Wonderful Life!!!

You know what would REALLY BE WONDERFUL?

1- Media HUNTS DOWN Sohanlal, shames him enough to last a couple of lifetimes, and then hands him over to the judiciary!

2- The judiciary re-opens the case, and awards him punishment that is fitting, for his crimes! It is never too late, is it?

It would be wonderful to see Sohanlal hanged in public, on the same day that Aruna might die!!!

3- Going forward, we must jointly expose rapists rather than the victims. Let us stop embarassing the poor victims, and make them feel they are still part of our society, and that it is the rapist who does not belong!!!

What do you think?

Freebie from WordPress – 2010 in review

The stats helper monkeys at WordPress.com mulled over how this blog did in 2010, and here’s a high level summary of its overall blog health:

Healthy blog!

The Blog-Health-o-Meter™ reads Wow.

Crunchy numbers

Featured image

About 3 million people visit the Taj Mahal every year. This blog was viewed about 36,000 times in 2010. If it were the Taj Mahal, it would take about 4 days for that many people to see it.

 

In 2010, there were 98 new posts, growing the total archive of this blog to 282 posts. There were 290 pictures uploaded, taking up a total of 81mb. That’s about 6 pictures per week.

The busiest day of the year was November 21st with 386 views. The most popular post that day was Lara ka Yoga!.

Where did they come from?

The top referring sites in 2010 were networkedblogs.com, Google Reader, indiblogger.in, google.co.in, and blogger.com.

Some visitors came searching, mostly for yoga, semiya payasam, short poem on myself, yoga images, and concentration camps gas chambers.

Attractions in 2010

These are the posts and pages that got the most views in 2010.

1

Lara ka Yoga! November 2010
28 comments

2

5 EASY STEPS TO MAKING SEMIYA PAYASAM (VERMICELLI KHEER) April 2009
37 comments

3

The TamBram’s guide to saving Money February 2010
69 comments

4

Tradition of touching feet February 2010
57 comments

5

Past Promises, Forgotten Futures (Fiction) October 2010
114 comments and 6 Likes on WordPress.com

(Now, how cool is that? This came as an automated email from WordPress, and I was super-impressed)

On making a difference

Year 2010 just began. And its nearly over too! Where do the days and years disappear? Days filled with insignificant, mundane chores! Days centred around our pretty selves!!

Perhaps, it is time to take some effort to ‘make a difference’ to those who really need help!

The Ojas Trust does precisely that. The Ojas is a Registered Educational and Charitable Trust.

Please do read their website to learn about all the fantastic work they are doing to help people who aren’t as fortunate.

A quick summary of their projects:

1. To mark its grand opening, The Ojas has adopted “Irular Colony”, near Ponneri, 75 kms from Chennai. The colony has about 1000 residents in 120 tiled and thatched huts. They don’t have access to drinking water and electricity. The Ojas is negotiating with the government to ensure that by end of project, the Colony has these two basic needs. Also, for Diwali 2010 – The Ojas is distributing new clothes to all the inmates along with Rice & Grains. The colony still needs lot of work …and we need you to help us with this! Please contact for more information – projects@theojastrust.org

2. The 12th Blood Donation Camp is scheduled to be held on Nov 14th, 2010 between 9.00 am and 12.30 pm at Aditya Ashwin Apts, Dr.Ranga Road, Mylapore, Chennai – 600 004. Additionally, we will be serving food to all the donors and volunteers on this day.
3. In order to spread awareness, The Ojas is also inviting people to come forward to “Donate Eyes”. Forms are available with representatives. The duly filled forms can be returned to us, which will be in turn deposited at “C U Shah Eye Bank, Sankara Nethralaya”.  Interested people may please contact Priya at 98840 36200 or email her- priya@theojastrust.org

4. Another new endevour of The Ojas to increase environmental responsibility is planting 86 fruit bearing coconut trees in Magaral Village, Tamil Nadu.

5. Representatives of The Ojas have personally visited and surveyed 18 homes (including baby-care units, orphanages, old-age homes, etc.,) in and around Chennai. The sum total of the needs have been clearly listed below.

• 2 ton AC for a Baby Care Unit

• 20 Steel Single Cots for a Old-Age Home

• Fans & Tubelights (50 numbers)

• Huggies (Different Sizes)

• Grinders/Mixie/Washing Machine

• Bedsheets & Pillow Covers

• Mike with Amplifier & speakers

• Large sized Aluminium vessels for cooking purposes

• Pressure Cooker (20 ltr size)

• Steel plates and tumblers (Over 500)

• Wax for candle making (Over 200 kgs)

• Tea Powder (Over 100 kgs)

6. The Trust will also be distributing 250 “AkshayaPatra” Bags that contain Rice, grains, pulses, oil, toilet & sanitational needs etc that cost Rs.2000 per bag. Each of these 250 bags will be given to Irular Colony and inmates of Leprosy Village.
7. Rice, pulses and grains in bulk quantities purchased for these homes. The requirement for each home varies from 100 kgs of rice to 50 kgs of dhal, oil, sugar, etc…

I just received this email:

Our first Grama Seva (Village Project) happened on October 24th 2010 in the Irular Village near Ponneri, Chennai. The inhabitants of more than 800 people were each given new clothes and sweet & savories. Additionally, every family (120 families) were given 25 kilos of rice and the Akshayapatra Bags. The Ojas Trust also gave large amounts of used clothes and other usable household things (such as mixie, vessels, umbrellas, etc..etc…) to the villagers. Chairs, large sized cloth mats (to be used on the floor) were given to the school.

About 35 volunteers representing The Ojas reached the village at about 10.00 hrs. The crowd was waiting in anticipation for their goodies. The organised crowd who were given tokens came forward to receive their gifts. Our volunteers went along personally to place the bags of rice in their respective homes. The village roads were in bad shape owing to rain the previous evening. The place immediately needs proper sanitation and that would soon be the area of focus of The Trust.



We sang devotional songs at the end of the distribution, made photographs along with the villagers and bid them farewell promising to come back again with more concrete plans. The school needs PRIORITY attention. The flooring is almost absent and children are often bit by insects as they sit inside the school. The leaking roof adds to the agony.

Those of us who are interested in promising these people better sanitation and a better environment to study – please write to us at -projects@theojastrust.org

Here is a picture update of the project! Thanks to all of you who made this project a reality! We look forward to your continued support!

If any of you would like to volunteer your services (or money too), please email priya@theojastrust.org


If any of you would like to volunteer your services (or money too), please email priya@theojastrust.org

Priya happens to be my ‘schoolmate’, and I can completely vouch for her genuineness!!